Should I redo my postbac?

Hello everyone!
After reading a few posts in here, I find them very helpful and encouraging. I have a situation that I have yet figured out and need some of your great advices. I started out my postbac last year with decent grades but it went downhill after that and mostly from last semester with a C and a D due to my neglects of studying and distractions. My postbac GPA went sour to 2.7 as of now. I wonder if I should redo my postbac at another institution as fresh start to improve my chances of getting accepted to med school?
PS: Please welcome me. I am a newbie here

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Hello everyone!
After reading a few posts in here, I find them very helpful and encouraging. I have a situation that I have yet figured out and need some of your great advices. I started out my postbac last year with decent grades but it went downhill after that and mostly from last semester with a C and a D due to my neglects of studying and distractions. My postbac GPA went sour to 2.7 as of now. I wonder if I should redo my postbac at another institution as fresh start to improve my chances of getting accepted to med school?
PS: Please welcome me. I am a newbie here


Hi there,
Welcome to the forums and we are very glad to have you. The answer to your question depends on a couple of things. First, what was your undergraduate like? Were you doing the post-bacc as “damage control” for a poor undergraduate performance or did you need to pick up the traditional pre-med courses because you were more of a “humanities” major and didn’t have too much science?
If you were doing “damage control” you have a bit more of a hole to dig out of. That being said, and if you read a few of the stories here, you know that it is possible to correct deep deficiences and get back on track. You just need to be sure that you are focused and distractions are at a minimum so that you can concentrate on your work.
The C and D generally indicate that you might have some knowledge deficits in the classes that you took so you may need to repeat these courses to make sure that you have enough of a knowledge base to apply that knowledge on the MCAT.
Even if you go to another institution, your GPA is going to follow you. If going to another institution means that your distractions are gone, then head on out and make a fresh start. As I am sure you know, you will still have to get your GPa up (take higher level courses and get As) as well as make sure that you do not fall back into the same patterns that got your Cs and Ds.
Your current GPA of 2.7 is not impossible to turn around but it will take some time and some solid performances. Take your time and do some quality work. Start with one coure and put all of your energy into doing well. Again, you are going to need As to offset your Cs and Ds.
Anything of quality takes consistant work and day to day movement towards your goal. Medicine is so “long term” that often many folks get so bogged down and never see the end of the process. Try to make some successful baby steps every day and make a list so that you can see how your little successes will add up to getting closer to your dream. Sure it may take a couple of extra years but in the long term, it is worth it if you are successful.
Keep your eyes on your goal and do some little thing each day that gets your closer. Keep a running list so that you see your progress. Don’t take “No” as a final answer if you feel that you know what you want. Find a way to get things done.
Look for Old Man Dave’s story of how he dug out of a 1.0-something GPA and is now a successful anesthesiologist. It is possible but it took some hard work and determination. His story is very inspiring to read because he believed in himself and keep on working towards his goal. I know that you can do the same.
Good luck and welcome!
Natalie

Thank you for your reply. Well, I have a undergrad in Computer Information System with a GPA of 3.42. I went to another institution to do my unofficial postbac but it didn’t turn out well with a GPA of 2.7 as I had mentioned above. After going through a lot of readings and researches, I found out that my chances of getting in a med school is close to none with 2.7 GPA. I still really want to pursue my career in medicine, so I am now thinking that it would be best for me to start a frest postbac elsewhere to regain me credibility as well as my chances to be on the competitive edge. When you apply to medical school, do they require to see all the courses and schools that you’ve ever took or attend? I was thinking more of not using any my current postbac grades as a meaning of a fresh start. Thank you!

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When you apply to medical school, do they require to see all the courses and schools that you’ve ever took or attend?


Yep…every single course ever taken at the college/university level.

I’ve heard a lot of people mentioned Old Man Dave. I am very curious about his story. Who is he? How did he manage to muscle into med school with a 1.0 GPA? I really want to know how did he turn things around? Do you have any link to his story? I couldn’t find it nowhere on google. TY

You can read all about OldManDave, a.k.a. Dave Kelley, D.O., PGY-3 in Anesthesiology at Dartmouth Medical Center and founder of OldPreMeds, here. (click)
Note that Dave pretty much re-did his entire college career. I’m sure he feels it was time well-spent as he is now doing what he loves.
Mary

Wow, that’s one truely inspirational story. What he had achieved is more than just an academic turn-around but the ability to differentiate (if not above) the traditional dotor norms.


That’s it. I am taking the biochemistry I now and I will accept nothing but an A. Thank you for all your valuable advices. I now just don’t see myself as a future doctor but a student with dedication and determination. A journey of a thousand mile must begin with a sigle step.

Best of luck to you! Stay focused and celebrate the each small success to help keep you there.
Larry

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When you apply to medical school, do they require to see all the courses and schools that you’ve ever took or attend?


Yep…every single course ever taken at the college/university level.


so: I took a trig class at a junior college while I was in high school, 13 years ago. I got a D. Do I have to get a transcript for this one ancient D?
I am sure the answer is yes. I shouldn’t even ask. i only just remembered about that class now, as i was reading this thread… and it made me cringe.

I understand this latter point: that we must report all grades to AAMC, but that they need to be backed up by transcripts. When I was in high school, I took a summer chemistry class at a junior college – my first college course. I got an A.
Last month, I contacted the junior college, and they have no record of my attendance. They searched via name, social security number, in all the years I was in high school up to the present, and zip nada nothing.
The same situation happened with my SAT scores. I tried to get copies of my SAT scores, and none could be found. The College Board says that there is nothing they can do about this situation. Unfortunately, I cannot find my paperwork for these scores, although they do appear on some of my original undergrad paperwork.
I will still report the A, but I have no third-party corroboration for that grade.

You need SAT scores for the AMCAS?

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You need SAT scores for the AMCAS?


Hi there,
I only remember my total SAT and would not have been able to locate the scores since I took SAT back in 1969. (Yes, I am that old!) I did not have to list SAT scores on AMCAS.
Natalie

No, AMCAS does not ask you to report your SAT scores. However, some medical schools may ask for it as part of their secondary application.
As for a grade for which you can’t produce a transcript - dunno what AMCAS will do w/ that. I suspect that without a transcript they’ll decide it doesn’t exist but I would never assume what the AMCAS will do.
Mary