Does anyone know about or heard of IUHS Medical School?

Hello future physicians,



I was hoping that if anyone can elaborate more on the below link for IUHS medical school and its validity on obtainig a MD degree? Does anyone know if the US medical schools will eventualy adopt this way of training for the first 2 years of medical school. Any information that can be provided will be invaluable.



http://www.iuhs.edu/admissions/school-of-medicine/



Thank you.



Perseverance… keeps honor bright: to have done, is to hang quite out of fashion, like a rusty nail in monumental mockery." William Shakespeare"



“Discipline weighs ounces but regret weighs tons.” – Jim Rollins



Being defeated is a temporary condition, but giving up is what makes it permanent.

Med school thus far (first year) has been mostly learning on our own with the help of professors and school resources. Online only isn’t a far stretch but I don’t think the learning process would be the same as it has been in class/anatomy lab/sim patients/etc. we’ve already been to the wards multiple times, and the environment is pretty motivating despite the 60-80 hours a week I’m putting in to class/study. You also lose a lot of the networking ability you gain by being at a real school.



I did an online MBA and missed the interaction I would have had in a classroom setting. While I spend tons more time out of the classroom learning on my own right now, I couldn’t imagine doing it at home, on my own, without being surrounded by people who are “suffering” through it with me.

I have meet with this school on several occasions. While I like the idea of their program, the reality of the residency squeeze for any off shore graduates has made me very hesitant to recommend any off shore school. This is particularly true of schools that are out of the big 3/4 in the Caribbean as well other established schools.



I think a more illuminating way to exam these programs is by the question of how many people who start in a school, finish and move into a residency slot. In US schools 94% graduate in 5 years, increasing to 97% in 8 years. The latter stat accounts for those with dual degrees. About 94% match each year with nearly the rest placing in a post-match process (SOAP, off cycle, etc) At one of the big 3/4 Caribbean schools, there are 25%-30% of students who do not make it thru the first 2 years and about the same who do make it thru the 2 clinical years. Of those who graduate at best 85% place into some residency slot. For example at SGU, 30% place in a non-match process. So with at least 50% of the students not graduating and 85% placement rate, you have about a 40%-45% chance of actually starting medical school in the Caribbean and actually getting into a residency slot. That is a huge risk of debt and no ability to practice medicine. Therefore, I am unable to recommend that any student consider off shore schools with at least 2 application cycles in the US for both MD and DO, with a break for application enhancement in between before considering a foreign school

In addition to the very valid points listed by gonnif above, I believe graduates from this school in particular (assuming they match) have issues with half or so of the states in the US not licensing them.

anyone expecting the military to pay their way thru med school or tuition re-reimbursement from military sources should keep in mind that US military programs are for US schools; foreign med schools will complicate such plans…

@Kennymac wrote:

Med school thus far (first year) has been mostly learning on our own with the help of professors and school resources. Online only isn’t a far stretch but I don’t think the learning process would be the same as it has been in class/anatomy lab/sim patients/etc. we’ve already been to the wards multiple times, and the environment is pretty motivating despite the 60-80 hours a week I’m putting in to class/study. You also lose a lot of the networking ability you gain by being at a real school.



I did an online MBA and missed the interaction I would have had in a classroom setting. While I spend tons more time out of the classroom learning on my own right now, I couldn’t imagine doing it at home, on my own, without being surrounded by people who are “suffering” through it with me.






Hello Kenny,



Are you still with IUHS? Can you post your experience thus far with this school please? Thanks.

@Prodigal wrote:

In addition to the very valid points listed by gonnif above, I believe graduates from this school in particular (assuming they match) have issues with half or so of the states in the US not licensing them.




Yes but even US medical schools are starting to move to online education for the basic sciences, slowly but in another 2 or 3 decades, we will see a lot of online education as our younger generation will demand it more as they grow up with an iPad pretty much from when they can speak their first words! :lol:

Have you found out anything else about this school? Yes it is risky but if you are willing to work a lot for it and pass all boards and get residency then at least 1 state would license you if you are ok to practice in any state that will license you.





@Dr.D.Heart wrote:

Hello future physicians,



I was hoping that if anyone can elaborate more on the below link for IUHS medical school and its validity on obtainig a MD degree? Does anyone know if the US medical schools will eventualy adopt this way of training for the first 2 years of medical school. Any information that can be provided will be invaluable.



http://www.iuhs.edu/admissions/school-of-medicine/



Thank you.



Perseverance… keeps honor bright: to have done, is to hang quite out of fashion, like a rusty nail in monumental mockery." William Shakespeare"



“Discipline weighs ounces but regret weighs tons.” – Jim Rollins



Being defeated is a temporary condition, but giving up is what makes it permanent.

Hello Kennymac,



Not sure if you still check this forum but if you do can you please share your experience thus far at IUHS? Are you MS2 now? Thanks.



@Kennymac wrote:

Med school thus far (first year) has been mostly learning on our own with the help of professors and school resources. Online only isn’t a far stretch but I don’t think the learning process would be the same as it has been in class/anatomy lab/sim patients/etc. we’ve already been to the wards multiple times, and the environment is pretty motivating despite the 60-80 hours a week I’m putting in to class/study. You also lose a lot of the networking ability you gain by being at a real school.



I did an online MBA and missed the interaction I would have had in a classroom setting. While I spend tons more time out of the classroom learning on my own right now, I couldn’t imagine doing it at home, on my own, without being surrounded by people who are “suffering” through it with me.

@mdiuhs wrote:

@Prodigal wrote:
In addition to the very valid points listed by gonnif above, I believe graduates from this school in particular (assuming they match) have issues with half or so of the states in the US not licensing them.




Yes but even US medical schools are starting to move to online education for the basic sciences, slowly but in another 2 or 3 decades, we will see a lot of online education as our younger generation will demand it more as they grow up with an iPad pretty much from when they can speak their first words! :lol:




Citation?



AT Still in AZ is the only school I am aware of which has moved to an online curriculum, but even then there is still a campus for labs.

@mdiuhs wrote:

Hello Kennymac,



Not sure if you still check this forum but if you do can you please share your experience thus far at IUHS? Are you MS2 now? Thanks.


I don't attend IUHS, I'm at a US MD program. I just have some experience with online courses/degree programs. I can see the benefits of online courses, but at least for me, it would be really tough to maintain motivation doing purely basic sciences online for 2 years. My current program incorporates some clinical correlation, small group learning, and clinical skills courses in parallel to the "basic science" classes (which themselves can be done 90% via distance learning). This is obviously different at different programs, and I know that some still do purely lecture-based basic science courses for the first 2 years.

Sorry I can't offer any experiences specific to IUHS.