Ok, got an interview, now what?

Well, I got the call for an interview with my first choice of school! Yep, I was walking about 3 feet off the ground that day. I set it up for a week from Thursday to give me time to get a suit (Men’s Wearhouse, here we come).
So, I’ve read over some of the interview feedback and for non-trads it seems to be ‘why medicine, why now?’ type of questions and ethical issues type of stuff. With working and all of that fun stuff, where can I get some good info on current issues facing medicine right now? Both pro and con?
Also, I’m thinking, ‘Break out the fine china’ and going with a conservative dark suit, rather than the tan sportcoat and slacks ensemble that I have now. Thoughts?
Yep, I’m jazzed. I’m not even typing straight…

DaveInDallas,
Congrats on your interview!
Kathy

For those of you getting interviews – how are you notified? Snail mail, email, phone?

Dave,
First of all, congrats on your upcoming interview.
I guess I can put my .02 in about the suit. The dark conservative suit is fine. Do realize that almost everyone else will be wearing a dark conservative suit as well.
I recently finished the famous book “Dress For Success”. This book was written in the 70’s; however, its suggestions for dress are still valid for today. The take home message from the book for me is “minorities should wear striped suits”.
Since almost everyone else is wearing a dark conservative suit, then your shirt and tie selection can bring out your creativity/personality. Just don’t overdo your creativity/ personality by wearing a psychadelic shirt and tie.

Molloy has an update out of both the women’s and the men’s editions, and though they are late 80’s early 90’s, they’re worth a read because:
1. Ronald Reagan changed everything (brown suits work now).
2. Hilary Clinton changed everything (too complicated to even discuss).

Quote:

For those of you getting interviews – how are you notified? Snail mail, email, phone?


Mine was via phone.

I would add one piece of advice: don’t introduce any potentially difficult topic in the interview unless you want to talk about it.
This includes your age, health, your significant other, your parents’ failing health, your kids, your plans to have kids, etc… I got into big trouble during my first interview because I mentioned age (in a positive way) and before I knew it I was getting difficult questions e.g. as an older student, how will you deal with the long hours required for rotations? Once you mention one of these issues, it is fair game, and perhaps you want to keep the interview focused on your skills and capabilities rather than the challenges you will face.
good luck

Ok, a questions?
What are some suggestions for handling the age old questions:
What are your strenght(s)?
What are you weakness(es)?
How do you deal with conflict?
are you a team player?
Describe a quality of leadership/managment quality that you have used successfully in the pass, and describe the situation.
any ideas folks?
much appreciated!
steven

My first two interviews are this week, I’m also going with a conservative (dark) suit + tie. I’ve been reviewing the questions asked and by far the one I’ve been struggling with most is:
"What is the biggest challenge facing medicine today?"
While I’d desperately like to say “weasely lawyers” (well, ok, I wouldn’t use those exact words!) and then give an example or two, I don’t know if this is kosher for an interview.
Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?

Quote:

My first two interviews are this week, I’m also going with a conservative (dark) suit + tie. I’ve been reviewing the questions asked and by far the one I’ve been struggling with most is:
"What is the biggest challenge facing medicine today?"
While I’d desperately like to say “weasely lawyers” (well, ok, I wouldn’t use those exact words!) and then give an example or two, I don’t know if this is kosher for an interview.


The lawyers on their own are not the problem. Unrealistic patient expectations and lack of public (jury) understanding of science/complex decision-making are the problem. Doctors are part of shaping those expectations. You can blame high-school science teachers as well if you like.
The point is that many challenges are created by a wide range of factors - socioeconomic, political, etc… Instead of having a single answer, it is good to be able to discuss those multifactorial problems.

Quote:

Ok, a questions?


What are some suggestions for handling the age old questions:





What are your strenght(s)?


What are you weakness(es)?


How do you deal with conflict?


are you a team player?


Describe a quality of leadership/managment quality that you have used successfully in the pass, and describe the situation.





any ideas folks?


much appreciated!


steven







the best answers to these questions are the ones that come from your own experience and are genuine and personal. If it’s easier, reword them,


e.g. what do your friends like most about you?


what is your most annoying quality?


what do you do when someone is obviously angry at you and you don’t know why?

Regarding the various questions. Remember, no one knows YOU like you know you. Answer from that perspective…don’t try to be someone you aren’t. Give the interviewer details that are specific to YOU (just like you [hopefully] did in the essays). You don’t want to say the same generalized “stuff” that everyone else interviewing might be saying. Make it personal.
Remember, interviews are just a conversation. Go into them expecting to enjoy it, and you will. Those who are interviewers do it because they enjoy talking with applicants.
Cheers,
Judy